News > Rhythmic air-puff into nasal cavity modulates activity across multiple brain areas: A non-invasive brain stimulation method to reduce ventilator-induced memory impairment
 


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Rhythmic air-puff into nasal cavity modulates activity across multiple brain areas: A non-invasive brain stimulation method to reduce ventilator-induced memory impairment

Mechanical ventilation (MV) can result in long-term brain impairments that are resistant to treatment. The mechanisms underlying MV-induced brain function impairment remain unclear. Since nasal airflow modulates brain activity, here we evaluated whether reinstating airflow during MV could influence the memory performance of rats after recovery. Rats were allocated into two study groups: one group received rhythmic air-puff into the nasal cavity during MV and a control group that underwent ventilation without air-puff. During MV, air-puffs induced time-locked event potentials in OB, mPFC and vHPC and significantly increased the oscillatory activity at the air-puff frequency. Furthermore, in mPFC and vHPC, (but not in OB), delta and theta oscillations were more prominent during air-puff application. After recovery, working memory performance was significantly higher in the air-puff group compared to control. Our study thus suggests a promising non-invasive brain stimulation approach to alleviate the neurological complications of prolonged mechanical ventilation.


10:00 - 2021/03/02    /    number : 102512    /    Show Count : 419



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